Author name: Luke Murphy

Explained in 60 seconds: Who should have their drinking water tested?

Private well-owners The HSE recommends that private wells should be tested at least once a year for microbial contamination and at least once every three years for chemical contamination. Private wells can become easily contaminated by both human and animal wastes, land-spreading or run-off from surrounding land. If you have concerns about the quality of …

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Northern Ireland Soil Testing Requirements

Northern Ireland farmers will soon be required to carry out soil testing on their land prior to using chemical phosphorus-rich manures and phosphorus fertilisers. This requirement will take effect from 1 January 2020 under the Nutrient Action Programme 2019-2022. Farmers receiving the Basic Payment Scheme must comply with soil testing requirements. Regular soil testing is …

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25% of the population believe they don’t need to conserve water due to the amount of rainfall

Behaviour and Analysis have carried out a survey for Irish Water which has revealed that over half of the Irish population acknowledge that they wastewater. While a quarter of the public believe that they don’t need to conserve water because of how much it rains. Irish Water are launching a conservation plan to encourage the …

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Trade Effluent to Sewers – Are you Compliant?

As an Environmental Consultancy company, we are increasingly coming across businesses which have difficulties because they have not obtained a licence for discharging their Trade Effluent* to the sewer. This can result in prosecution and negative publicity, all of which can be costly for the business. Do I need a Trade Effluent Discharge to Sewer Licence for …

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Cation Exchange Capacity: The Forgotten Test of Irish Soil Analysis

The Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) of a soil is an intrinsic property of the soil. It determines the soils ability to move nutrients from the soil particles to the soil solution where it is readily available for plant uptake. Knowing your soil’s CEC is invaluable when determining your soils fertiliser requirements. Nonetheless, in recent years …

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